Carbon capture and storage:

Carbon capture and storage

  • Experimental optimization of post combustion carbon capture process for climate change mitigation

    Process modelling and flexibility study of Coal-fired Power Plants integrated with intensified solvent based Carbon Capture

    Supervisor: Prof Meihong Wang, Prof Mohamed Pourkashanian, Prof Lin Ma

    Coal is the major primary energy source in many countries such as China and India. Coal-fired power plants are the largest single sources of CO2 emissions. Therefore, carbon capture for coal-fired power plants is vital to achieve the CO2 emission reduction target. Solvent based carbon capture is the most matured technology for commercial deployment. However, it suffers from high capital cost and energy consumption for solvent regeneration. The new solution is to apply process intensification technology for solvent based carbon capture. This project aims to study how to implement intensified carbon capture using solvents for coal-fired power plants based on process modelling and simulation.

  • Experimental optimization of post combustion carbon capture process for climate change mitigation

    Capture and Storage, and Cleaner Fossil Energy

    Supervisor:

  • Experimental optimization of post combustion carbon capture process for climate change mitigation

    Particle size distribution in flue gases for carbon capture

    Supervisor: Professor Mohamed Pourkashanian, Professor Lin Ma, Dr Kevin Hughes and Dr Karen N Finney

    The UKCCSRC PACT Facilities are home to numerous combustion devices: natural gas-fired gas turbines and a pulverized fuel reactor burning coal and biomass, used for CCS applications either coupled with post-combustion capture or when operating under oxy-combustion conditions. This project will use differential mass spectrometry to compare submicron particulate emissions from the different reactors using different fuels and operating regimes. This will consider the particle size spectra, particle measurement programme-correlated number and gravimetrically-correlated mass in real-time. Particles can bypass collection systems, and therefore need to be assessed as they can interfere with downstream processes and have health implications. Based on the results, strategic mitigation methods can be devised for each condition/fuel combination. This will include evaluating the necessary measures to be taken to minimize impacts on flue gas cleaning, solvent-based carbon capture (to minimize degradation) and on CO2 stream treatment, transport and storage.

     

  • Experimental optimization of post combustion carbon capture process for climate change mitigation

    Programme: Hybrid CFD and process simulation for process intensification of post-combustion CO2 capture

    Supervisor: Professor Mohamed Pourkashanian, Professor Lin Ma, Dr Kevin Hughes and Prof Ingham

    This project will investigate the most efficient modelling strategy of simulating the CO2 capture process in a novel packed bed for process intensification. A combined computational, experimental and process modelling technique will be employed.

     

  • Experimental optimization of post combustion carbon capture process for climate change mitigation

    Pilot plant experimental work - 250 kW PACT facility - zero emission strategies - coal- biomass and bio-CCS

    Supervisor: Professor Mohamed Pourkashanian, Dr W Nimmo

    Fossil fuel will remain a significant contributor to power generation around the world as countries develop and realise their economic and social potentials through industrial growth and increase in people’s standard of living. For example, coal remains a principal fuel for electricity generation (~40% of the world market) and contributes ~43% of CO2 emissions from the combustion of all fossil fuels. Therefore, in order to meet CO2 reduction targets, the urgency of developing, demonstrating, and deploying Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technologies is clear, supported by the recently released Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report.

    Oxyfuel combustion is one of the front running technologies for CO2 capture in power generation and energy intensive industries, as recognised by the UK government’s recent announcement to fund the FEED study for the White Rose Partnership project as part of the £1bn DECC competition for CCS commercialisation. Displacement of coal by biomass with CCS is a method of gaining benefits from negative CO2 emissions.

    The project will involve detailed experimental work performed on the 250kW combustion test facility associated with funded projects in the area of oxyfuel combustion. Coal and biomass fuels will be used and flame analysis methods will be employed; heat flux, temperature, chemical species and emissions. The effect of flue gas recycle conditions on flame characteristics and emissions will also be investigated