Carbon capture and storage:

Carbon capture and storage

  • Experimental optimization of post combustion carbon capture process for climate change mitigation

    Dynamic simulation of load-following power plants integrated with CO2 capture technologies

    Supervisor: Professor Mohamed Pourkashanian, Dr Kevin Hughes, Professor Lin Ma and Dr Maria Elena Diego de Paz

     

    Flexible operation of fossil fuel power plants is becoming a hot topic in the energy generation sector due to the expected increase of intrinsically intermittent renewable technologies in the energy mix in the near future. This flexible operation mode of the energy systems is challenging, especially when these plants are coupled to CO2 capture technologies. This study aims at investigating the dynamic behavior of natural gas fired power plants integrated with a post-combustion amine CO2 capture system, using process simulation tools such as Aspen Hysys and/or gCCS (gPROMS). The performance of the whole system will be assessed under dynamic conditions. Different integration options between the power plant and the capture system will be studied and analysed from a techno-economic perspective.

     

  • Experimental optimization of post combustion carbon capture process for climate change mitigation

    Analysis of post-combustion CO2 capture from natural gas power plants using CFD and process co-simulation

    Supervisor: Supervisor:  Professor Mohamed Pourkashanian, Dr Kevin Hughes, Professor Lin Ma and Dr Maria Elena Diego de Paz

    The use of natural gas as a fuel for electricity production is expected to gradually increase in the next decades. Since it is acknowledged that large CO2 emission cuts should be achieved in the near future, it seems plausible that these systems may have to be coupled to CO2 capture schemes. This research project focuses on combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and process simulation tools to study in detail the performance of an amine capture post-combustion plant coupled to a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plant using the synergetic combination between Ansys Fluent and Aspen Hysys/gCCS (gPROMS) modelling tools. The idea is to replace the typical absorber and stripper blocks present in the process simulation flowsheet by more detail-designed units built using CFD tools. This will allow for a more accurate description of the system and better characterization of the performance of the key units of the capture process. Several NGCC variants will be studied and analyzed following this procedure, including conventional NGCC plants and those incorporating exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and selective exhaust gas recirculation (S-EGR) options. This is part of research activities that include virtual reality power industry plant simulation.

     

  • Experimental optimization of post combustion carbon capture process for climate change mitigation

    Process modelling of biomass gasification systems integrated with CO2 capture

    Supervisor: Professor Mohamed Pourkashanian, Dr Kevin Hughes, Professor Lin Ma and Dr Maria Elena Diego de Paz

    Combination of energy generation from biomass sources and CO2 capture technologies (Bio-CCS or BECCS) is already recognized as a potential option to tackle climate change in most scenarios, as it is linked to the concept of negative CO2 emissions. This project will use process simulation tools such as Aspen Hysys or gCCS (gPROMS) to investigate these systems. A complete and rigorous model will be created and run for the gasification system, considering a range of biomass sources (including wastes) with different composition as raw materials. Several CO2 capture technologies will be then simulated and coupled to the gasification system (e.g., amines, Rectisol process, VSA, etc.) incorporating the latest advancements. A techno-economic analysis will be conducted and these options will be compared in terms of capture performance, energy consumption and cost.

     

  • Experimental optimization of post combustion carbon capture process for climate change mitigation

    Integration of membranes at PACT for industrial testing with real/synthetic flue gases

    Supervisor: Professor Mohamed Pourkashanian, Professor Lin Ma, Dr Kevin Hughes and Dr Karen N Finney

    A pre-pilot-scale membrane module prototype will be installed for industrial testing at the UKCCSRC PACT) Facilities, integrated with a gas turbine and a solid fuel reactor for coal/biomass to test number of fuels and operating conditions.  This focuses specifically on nano-material enhanced membranes for improved CCS applications. The developed pre-pilot membrane modules will be evaluated under a range of different industrially relevant conditions, with a number of different process relevant gases including real and fully synthetic flue gas.  This will include flue gas emissions from any power plant operating under any given conditions and with any fuel(s), as well as representative emissions from industrial activities. The operation of the membrane will subsequently allow for extensive performance assessments, ensuring comprehensive characterization of the pilot module.  Such testing will enable a wide variety of conditions and thus an array of industrially significant environments to be assessed.

     

  • Experimental optimization of post combustion carbon capture process for climate change mitigation

    Particle size distribution in flue gases for carbon capture

    Supervisor: Professor Mohamed Pourkashanian, Professor Lin Ma, Dr Kevin Hughes and Dr Karen N Finney

    The UKCCSRC PACT Facilities are home to numerous combustion devices: natural gas-fired gas turbines and a pulverized fuel reactor burning coal and biomass, used for CCS applications either coupled with post-combustion capture or when operating under oxy-combustion conditions.  This project will use differential mass spectrometry to compare submicron particulate emissions from the different reactors using different fuels and operating regimes.  This will consider the particle size spectra, particle measurement programme-correlated number and gravimetrically-correlated mass in real-time.  Particles can bypass collection systems, and therefore need to be assessed as they can interfere with downstream processes and have health implications.  Based on the results, strategic mitigation methods can be devised for each condition/fuel combination.  This will include evaluating the necessary measures to be taken to minimize impacts on flue gas cleaning, solvent-based carbon capture (to minimize degradation) and on CO2 stream treatment, transport and storage.