Energy Use:

Carbon capture and storage

  • Self-funded PhD: Enabling Net Zero Emissions Targets through Post Combustion Capture (PCC) of CO2 Using Amine-based Emerging Technology

    The Development of Models for Mercury Oxidation in Oxyfuel Combustion

    Supervisor: Professor Mohamed Pourkashanian, Professor Lin Ma and Dr Kevin Hughes

    Oxyfuel combustion is one of the leading technologies for Carbon Capture and Storage. Mercury is released to the gas-phase during oxyfuel combustion of coal and biomass and form trace species in flue-gas. Mercury compounds can pose corrosion problems for oxyfuel combustion power plants. Carbon in ash is believed to be a key driving force for reaction and absorption of mercury in power plants. A predictive model for mercury behaviour in oxyfuel power plants would help select suitable control strategies. This project aims to develop a heterogeneous chemical kinetic model for mercury reaction on carbon surfaces with the aid of molecular modelling tools such as Guassian, chemical kinetics programs like Chemkin and Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) codes such as Fluent.

  • Self-funded PhD: Enabling Net Zero Emissions Targets through Post Combustion Capture (PCC) of CO2 Using Amine-based Emerging Technology

    Experimental and Modelling Study of Amine Degradation in the Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Process

    Supervisor: Professor Mohamed Pourkashanian, Professor Lin Ma and Dr Kevin Hughes

    Post-combustion capture of CO2 from fossil fuel derived flue gas using amines is one of the leading Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technologies. The amines used for post-combustion capture can degrade in the presence of oxygen and other flue gas compounds and an understanding of the nature of amine degradation is important for accelerating deployment of the technology. This project will conduct laboratory and pilot-scale experimental investigations into amine degradation in order to characterise the liquid phase reaction rates using GC-MS and HPLC and also simultaneously characterise the rate of evolution of gas-phase species using FTIR. The experimental results will be used to develop liquid-gas phase numerical chemical kinetic models which can be incorporated into process system simulation models of the post-combustion capture process such as Aspen.

  • Self-funded PhD: Enabling Net Zero Emissions Targets through Post Combustion Capture (PCC) of CO2 Using Amine-based Emerging Technology

    Ash Melting Behaviour and Deposition in Oxyfuel Biomass Combustion

    Supervisor: Professor Mohamed Pourkashanian, Professor Lin Ma and Dr Kevin Hughes

    The combustion of biomass is proposed as a “carbon neutral” alternative to fossil fuel utilisation and even a “carbon negative” technology when combined with Carbon Capture and Storage technologies such as oxyfuel combustion (Bio-CCS). Biomass contains significant amounts of alkali metals, which modify ash melting, slagging, fouling and deposition behaviour within power plant equipment. This project will first investigate thermodynamically the ash melting behaviour of biomass/coal mixtures at oxyfuel conditions. The project will then focus on the chemical kinetic behaviour of alkali salts at oxyfuel conditions using kinetic modelling techniques such as chemkin. Finally the project will couple chemical kinetic models to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for the prediction of ash deposition inside power plant equipment under bio-CCS conditions.

  • Self-funded PhD: Enabling Net Zero Emissions Targets through Post Combustion Capture (PCC) of CO2 Using Amine-based Emerging Technology

    Slagging and ash deposition prediction

    Supervisor: Professor Mohamed Pourkashanian, Professor Lin Ma and Professor Derek Ingham

    Ash related problems such as slagging, fouling, and corrosions on the superheat-exchange tubes are significant problems of coal fired power plant, in particular when firing low grade coals, biomass and under oxyfuel conditions. Increased ash deposition in boilers would reduce system efficiency and also affect safe operation. An advanced ash deposition models will be developed in order to simulate the ash deposition processes that occur during combustion. The new model development will be based on an existing model that has previously been developed at Leeds and will be validated against measurement data. The successful outcome of this research will be very useful for fuel selection and combustion system optimization for future power generation plant.

  • Self-funded PhD: Enabling Net Zero Emissions Targets through Post Combustion Capture (PCC) of CO2 Using Amine-based Emerging Technology

    Modelling post combustion amine CO2 capture plant

    Supervisor: Professor Mohamed Pourkashanian, Professor Lin Ma and Dr Kevin Hughes

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is an emerging near-zero emission technology that can applied to next generation gas turbine based power stations, new and retrofit, leading to a substantial reduction in carbon emission to the atmosphere. This project will develop novel performance assessment tools for simulating the CO2 absorption process in an amine plant. Plant process simulation software packages, such as gPROMs and Aspen will be employed with some complementary experimental investigations. The outcome from the project may be used in assisting future CCS power plant design optimisation.