Combustion:

Conventional power generation

  • PhD scholarship: Deposition prevention for future power stations – an international collaboration with USA

    PhD scholarship: Deposition prevention for future power stations – an international collaboration with USA

     

    The concern over the environment impact of burning fossil fuels for power generation and fluctuations in the fuel price have led to the power plants increasingly using variable fuels and biomass. Some of these fuels often have very different chemical compositions and can cause severe deposition inside the combustion furnace and this can potentially lead to a substantial reduction in the efficiency of the boiler and unscheduled boiler shutdown. This has become a significant operational constraint for existing power stations to expand their range of fuel diet. Thus predicting deposition and slagging propensity is of vital importance to power plants running new fuels.

    This PhD Studentship will support the research on particulate behaviours of new fuels and develop novel predictive models for slagging and fouling in industrial furnaces. The project will be built on existing research, which has previously been carried out for many years by the Sheffield team, with the measurement data from the national PACT facilities and in collaboration with Electric Power Research Institute in the USA.

    The studentship will be available for a period of 3.0 years at the standard EPSRC rate which covers UK/EU fees and includes a non-taxable stipend, currently of £14,296p.a., and a budget for IT equipment, books, software and travelling to conferences, and/or project meetings.

    Potential applicants should have, or are expecting to obtain in the near future, a first class honours degree in engineering, mathematics, or science. The studentship is open to UK/EU candidates only and therefore the successful candidates should fulfil the eligibility criteria for EPSRC funding through UK nationality and/or residency status.

    The research work will be based in the Energy 2050 initiative, the Department of Mechanical Engineering, to develop world-leading activity in energy research. The student will be working within an exciting and dynamic group with approximately 40 PhD researchers and over 12 postdoctoral research fellows undertaking a broad area of energy research with strong links to industry.

    The Department of Mechanical Engineering has been a major discipline in the University since its foundation in 1905. The Research Excellence Framework (REF, December 2014) placed the Department within the Top 5 for Mechanical Engineering in the UK.

    For further information please contact Professor Derek Ingham (D.Ingham@Sheffield.ac.uk)

  • PhD scholarship: Deposition prevention for future power stations – an international collaboration with USA

    PhD scholarship: Zero emissions power plants through combustion optimisation

    The combustion of fossil fuels for power generation will remain to play a significant role to meet the increasing energy demand in the foreseeable future. Improving the fundamental understanding of the combustion and pollutant formation processes can lead to improved plant performance and substantially reduce the pollutant emission.

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modelling is a powerful tool that, due to recent advances in computational power, has become useful in aiding the design and development of advanced power generation technologies with significant climate change mitigation potential. This project will use CFD as a tool, including using the Reynolds Average NS equations (RANS) and the Large Eddie Simulations (LES) and develop advanced new models to investigate the combustion phenomena that drive the heat transfer, pollutant emissions of thermal fired power plants. The research will be supported from the data collected from the national PACT facilities as validation and verification. The research output will directly contribute to the next generation flexible and low emission burner designs for stable and efficient operation of power plants.

    The studentship will support a highly motivated researcher to undertake this cutting edge research for future energy and power generation technologies. The successful applicants will receive appropriate training to work at the forefront of research.

    The studentship will be available for a period of 3.0 years at the standard EPSRC rate which covers UK/EU fees and includes a non-taxable stipend, currently of £14,296p.a., and a budget for IT equipment, books, software and travelling to conferences, and/or project meetings.

    Potential applicants should have, or are expecting to obtain in the near future, a first class honours degree in engineering, mathematics, or science. The studentship is open to UK/EU candidates only and therefore the successful candidates should fulfil the eligibility criteria for EPSRC funding through UK nationality and/or residency status.

    The research work will be based in the Energy 2050 initiative within the University of Sheffield, and the Department of Mechanical Engineering to develop world-leading activity in energy research. The student will be working within an exciting and dynamic group with approximately 40 PhD researchers and over 12 postdoctoral research fellows undertaking a broad area of energy research with strong links to industry.

    The Department of Mechanical Engineering has been a major discipline in the University since its foundation in 1905. The Research Excellence Framework (REF, December 2014) placed the Department within the Top 5 for Mechanical Engineering in the UK.

    For further information please contact Professor Derek Ingham (email: d.ingham@sheffield.ac.uk)

  • PhD scholarship: Deposition prevention for future power stations – an international collaboration with USA

    Conventional Renewable power generation – Fluidised Bed Biomass combustion

     

    To achieve the UK’s ambitious target of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 80% by 2050 without compromising energy security, the UK’s conventional power plants must be operated in a flexible manner in terms of high efficiency, using alternative fuels (e.g. biomass) and integrating technologies for carbon abatement (e.g. Carbon Capture and Storage, CCS). Ultra-supercritical (USC) steam Rankine cycle power generation combined with Circulating Fluidised Bed (CFB) and Fluidized Bed (FB) combustion technology is the most viable alternative to the pulverised coal (PC)-based USC power generation. In addition, operating under USC/FB/CFB conditions has a number of advantages over USC/PC, particularly regarding fuel flexibility.

    However, there are still many fundamental research and technical challenges facing the development of this technology. In particular, combustion issues related to safe and stable operation of CFB/FB boilers when burning a variety of solid fuels are not yet fully understood and there is a great need to develop novel materials that will be able to cope with adverse conditions associated with operation.

    The specific project areas would include:

    To understand how the combustion of a variety of fuels affects Emissions, bed material agglomeration, fouling and corrosion of boiler heat exchanger tubes.

    Facilities at the University main campus and at the LCCC will be offered to suitably qualified students for study leading to a PhD in combinations of the following areas.

    1.       combustion testing at pilot scale  (250 kW Fluidised bed),

    2.       deposition testing and experimentation at pilot plant scale,

    3.       corrosion testing in lab scale furnaces,

    4.       fundamental TGA decomposition studies,

    5.       Biomass characterisation

    6.       Fluidised bed modelling and CFD studies

     

  • PhD scholarship: Deposition prevention for future power stations – an international collaboration with USA

    Ash Melting Behaviour and Deposition in Oxyfuel Biomass Combustion

    The combustion of biomass is proposed as a “carbon neutral” alternative to fossil fuel utilisation and even a “carbon negative” technology when combined with Carbon Capture and Storage technologies such as oxyfuel combustion (Bio-CCS). Biomass contains significant amounts of alkali metals, which modify ash melting, slagging, fouling and deposition behaviour within power plant equipment. This project will first investigate thermodynamically the ash melting behaviour of biomass/coal mixtures at oxyfuel conditions. The project will then focus on the chemical kinetic behaviour of alkali salts at oxyfuel conditions using kinetic modelling techniques such as chemkin. Finally the project will couple chemical kinetic models to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for the prediction of ash deposition inside power plant equipment under bio-CCS conditions.

  • PhD scholarship: Deposition prevention for future power stations – an international collaboration with USA

    Slagging and ash deposition prediction

    Ash related problems such as slagging, fouling, and corrosions on the superheat-exchange tubes are significant problems of coal fired power plant, in particular when firing low grade coals, biomass and under oxyfuel conditions. Increased ash deposition in boilers would reduce system efficiency and also affect safe operation. An advanced ash deposition models will be developed in order to simulate the ash deposition processes that occur during combustion. The new model development will be based on an existing model that has previously been developed at Leeds and will be validated against measurement data. The successful outcome of this research will be very useful for fuel selection and combustion system optimization for future power generation plant.