Process modelling:

Process modelling

  • A Societal Index Model for the Assessment of the Safety, Operability and Resilience level of Regional Mini Energy Grid

    Modelling gas turbine based power generation system incorporating CCS technology

    Supervisor: Professor Mohamed Pourkashanian, Professor Lin Ma and Dr Kevin Hughes

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is an emerging near-zero emission technology that can applied to next generation gas turbine based power stations, new and retrofit, leading to a substantial reduction in carbon emission to the atmosphere. This project will develop novel performance and/or techno‐economic assessment tools for simulating gas turbine based power generation system employing different CCS technologies. Plant process simulation software packages, such as the gPROMs and Aspen will be employed with some complementary experimental investigations. The outcome from the project may be used in assisting future CCS power plant design optimisation.

  • A Societal Index Model for the Assessment of the Safety, Operability and Resilience level of Regional Mini Energy Grid

    Modelling post combustion amine CO2 capture plant

    Supervisor: Professor Mohamed Pourkashanian, Professor Lin Ma and Dr Kevin Hughes

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is an emerging near-zero emission technology that can applied to next generation gas turbine based power stations, new and retrofit, leading to a substantial reduction in carbon emission to the atmosphere. This project will develop novel performance assessment tools for simulating the CO2 absorption process in a amine plant. Plant process simulation software packages, such as gPROMs and Aspen will be employed with some complementary experimental investigations. The outcome from the project may be used in assisting future CCS power plant design optimisation

  • A Societal Index Model for the Assessment of the Safety, Operability and Resilience level of Regional Mini Energy Grid

    Oxyfuel Combustion plant – CCS; experiment and modelling

    Supervisor: Professor Mohamed Pourkashanian, Professor Lin Ma and Dr Kevin Hughes

    This project will combine an experimental and modelling study of an oxyfuel combustion plant with CCS. A 250 kW pulverised coal/biomass burner operating under air or oxy-fired conditions is connected to a post combustion amine capture plant to remove CO2 from the exhaust gas stream, and the efficiency of this as a function of operating conditions will be investigated. This will be complemented by process simulation with the gPROMS or ASPEN software package to investigate the overall system performance and economics.

  • A Societal Index Model for the Assessment of the Safety, Operability and Resilience level of Regional Mini Energy Grid

    Amine solvent degradation in CO2 capture

    Supervisor: Professor Mohamed Pourkashanian, Professor Lin Ma and Dr Kevin Hughes

    CO2 capture and storage is believed to be a promising option for controlling CO2 emissions in the short to medium term. Several methods exist for CO2 capture, with amine capture being the most promising commercial technology at the present time. In this method, a series of degradation products with possible impact to the environment and human health may be formed. These substances may have a wide range of chemical characteristics, such as high pKa, low pKa, polar substituents, multifunctional and mono functional groups. The goal of this project is to measure these species by various experimental techniques, and develop chemical kinetic and physical models that predict the degradation and emission of these substances within the amine capture plant, and additionally predict their atmospheric fate. This will make use of the UKCCSRC PACT facilities to provide experimental data from a pilot scale amine capture plant.

  • A Societal Index Model for the Assessment of the Safety, Operability and Resilience level of Regional Mini Energy Grid

    Negative CO2 Emissions Through Combining Bio-Energy And Carbon Capture

    Supervisor: Professor Mohamed Pourkashanian, Professor Lin Ma and Dr Kevin Hughes

    Stringent CO2 emission reduction targets that are now in effect mean that the carbon intensity of energy generation from all sources needs to be considerably reduced in order to meet such goals. The use of biomass fuels – either dedicated biomass firing or co-firing with fossil fuels, such as coal – can considerably minimise the net CO2 emissions to atmosphere from conventional energy generation processes, i.e. combustion. Coupling biomass utilisation with carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies could mean the CO2 emissions from such forms of energy production are further reduced and even have the potential to lead to zero or negative emissions. This project will aim to compare different fuel resources (coal, wood chips and co-firing these two fuels) in terms of their carbon intensity and techno-economics, when used with and without CCS applications. A large-scale power facility will be modelled using the IECM and Aspen packages to achieve the project objectives, with input data and other parameters being acquired from the literature review conducted.