Process modelling:

Process modelling

  • A Societal Index Model for the Assessment of the Safety, Operability and Resilience level of Regional Mini Energy Grid

    Carbon capture from gas turbines

    Supervisor: Professor Mohamed Pourkashanian, Professor Lin Ma and Dr Kevin Hughes

    Natural gas is seen as cleaner than other fossil fuels and will continue to have an essential role in the energy mix of the future, particularly in the UK. There are however stringent CO2 emission reduction targets in place and therefore the carbon intensity of energy generation from all sources needs to be considerably reduced, predominantly from fossil fuel sources. Gas turbines already generate relatively low levels of CO2, but coupled with post-combustion carbon capture and storage (CCS), they will be an integral technology for the UK to meet such environmental legislation. Design improvements on both the power generation side and capture plant side however will be required to optimise this process and their integration, as well as to enhance the overall system efficiency. After a review of pertinent literature, this project will initially consist of modelling the gas turbine at the UKCCSRC National Research Facilities – PACT (www.pact.ac.uk). To improve plant performance, selective exhaust gas recycling will also be modelled – this involves selectively recirculating the CO2 separated from the flue gases back into the compressor inlet. The flue gases are passed through a membrane to separate out the CO2 from the other exhaust components. Comparative studies with conventional flue gas recycling (no CO2 separation) can be conducted. Aspen Plus will be used to facilitate this work and accomplish the project aims, which can be validated using the baseline experimental data already acquired for the gas turbine in question.

  • A Societal Index Model for the Assessment of the Safety, Operability and Resilience level of Regional Mini Energy Grid

    Novel gas turbine configurations for carbon capture

    Supervisor: Professor Mohamed Pourkashanian, Professor Lin Ma and Dr Kevin Hughes

    Natural gas will play a significant role in the future energy mix. Natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants produce around half the emissions of advanced coal-fired power plants. However, even if natural gas is used to replace all coal consumption, the reduced emissions would not meet the global reduction targets set by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Therefore, NGCC with post-combustion CO2 capture can have a benefit in the next-generation power systems. One key challenge of integrating carbon capture with an NGCC power plant is that the plant efficiency is reduced by about 15%. As a result, novel configurations are needed to increase the plant efficiency and power output of the system. Some options are exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), Humid Air Turbine (HAT), steam and water injection, and hybrid systems. These configurations can be assessed by simulation software tools to identify technical advantages of the proposed modifications.

  • A Societal Index Model for the Assessment of the Safety, Operability and Resilience level of Regional Mini Energy Grid

    Dynamic simulation of power generation plant for carbon capture and storage

    Supervisor: Professor Mohamed Pourkashanian, Professor Lin Ma and Dr Kevin Hughes

    The new generation of power plants should offer effective solutions to reduce emissions and implement CO2 capture and storage. However, the combination of a complex fuel-processing plant and the level of integration lead to challenging problems with respect to the dynamic/transient operation. In addition, electricity market demands require more flexible controlling of the power plant output. These operation specifications can be satisfied by proper design of the process, its equipment and control system. A dynamic model of the entire system is an advantageous tool to test the effect of different process configurations and different control strategies. For carbon capture, an oxygen-rich oxidant is used, which requires an air separation unit for oxygen generation. Power generation plant options are Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Oxyfuel combustion.