Energy Policy and Analysis:

Techno-economics

  • Techno-economic assessment of large scale liquefied hydrogen production and shipping

    Techno-economic assessment of large scale liquefied hydrogen production and shipping

    Supervisor: Professor Mohamed Poukashanian, Dr Kevin Hughes and Dr Stavros Michailos

    Global hydrogen production is over 55 million tonnes per year and the majority of this is produced and used within industrial sites as captive hydrogen or as industry feedstock. Nevertheless, there has been an increasing interest in expanding the utilisation of hydrogen in other sectors such as power generation, heating and transport as its combustion generates no pollutants. This trend, known as ‘hydrogen economy’, has triggered efforts to identify solutions that can produce low-cost, zero-carbon and large-scale hydrogen production. There are two ways to produce green hydrogen, namely electrolysis powered by renewable energy and from fossil fuels coupled with carbon capture and storage (CCS) and in order to achieve a ‘hydrogen economy’ with large scale production and usage, it is necessary to massively develop new infrastructures to produce and transport hydrogen. A solution in this regard is to produce hydrogen in a large scale at locations with suitable techno-economic conditions and then liquefy and transport it to the end users. To this end, the study will carry out rigorous techno-economic assessments of different hydrogen generation technologies, such as electrolysis, coal gasification and natural gas reforming to identify the potential of large scale hydrogen production and transport in different locations. This project will involve a substantial amount of process modelling and the development of the relevant modelling skills. In particular, the project will involve  the development of  the  commercial softwares, such as Aspen Plus/Hysys and Matlab and other related softwares.

  • Techno-economic assessment of large scale liquefied hydrogen production and shipping

    Techno-economic optimisation of the CO2 value chain

    Supervisor: Professor Mohamed Pourkashanian, Dr Kevin Hughes and Dr Stavros Michailos

    The utilisation of CO2 within the Power-to-X (PtX) concept can produce value added products, such as fuels and chemicals that can substitute fossil value chains and has the potential to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. The CO2 value chain is still at a early stage of development and therefore early stage techno-economic assessments can substantially improve future decision-making and scaling-up. There exists numerous alternative pathways to utilise CO2 and as such the optimisation of the CO2 value chain is of paramount importance. In this way, very useful information can be provided to policy makers, investors and funding bodies. The problem will be formulated by considering different hydrogen generation technologies, CO2 sources and CO2 conversion technologies. Subsequently superstructure optimisation techniques will be applied to solve the problem and identify optimum techno-economic conditions. This project will involve a substantial amount of process modelling and the development of the relevant modelling skillsIn particular, the project will involve the development of  the commercial softwares, such as Aspen Plus/Hysys and Matlab and other related softwares.

  • Techno-economic assessment of large scale liquefied hydrogen production and shipping

    Techno-economic investigation of a Syngas – Combined Cycle Gas Turbine – Amine Capture Plant

    Supervisor: Professor Mohamed Pourkashanian, Professor Lin Ma and Dr Kevin Hughes

    This project will comprise a process modelling study of syngas production in conjunction with a combined cycle gas turbine with CCS using an amine capture plant. Process modelling, using either ASPEN, gPROMS or the SimSci software packages will be used to investigate the technical performance and economics of this combined system, allowing its optimisation from a performance and/or economic viewpoint. This will draw on the experimental data available from a pilot scale operation of a Turbec T100 gas turbine connected to an Amine capture plant at the UKCCSRC PACT facilities.

     

  • Techno-economic assessment of large scale liquefied hydrogen production and shipping

    Dynamic simulation of load-following power plants integrated with CO2 capture technologies

    Supervisor: Professor Mohamed Pourkashanian, Dr Kevin Hughes, Professor Lin Ma and Dr Maria Elena Diego de Paz

    Flexible operation of fossil fuel power plants is becoming a hot topic in the energy generation sector due to the expected increase of intrinsically intermittent renewable technologies in the energy mix in the near future. This flexible operation mode of the energy systems is challenging, especially when these plants are coupled to CO2 capture technologies. This study aims at investigating the dynamic behavior of natural gas fired power plants integrated with a post-combustion amine CO2 capture system, using process simulation tools such as Aspen Hysys and/or gCCS (gPROMS). The performance of the whole system will be assessed under dynamic conditions. Different integration options between the power plant and the capture system will be studied and analysed from a techno-economic perspective.

     

  • Techno-economic assessment of large scale liquefied hydrogen production and shipping

    Combined Cycle Gas Turbine – CCS; experiment and modelling

    Supervisor: Professor Mohamed Pourkashanian, Professor Lin Ma and Dr Kevin Hughes

    This project will combine an experimental and modelling study of a combined cycle gas turbine with CCS. A Turbec T100 gas turbine will be modified to allow the investigation of the effect of exhaust gas recycle and or steam injection on its performance, with measurement of power output and exhaust gas emissions. The exhaust is connected to a post combustion amine capture plant to remove CO2 from the exhaust gas stream, and the efficiency of this as a function of turbine operating conditions will also be investigated. This will be complemented by process simulation with the gPROMS or ASPEN software package to investigate the overall system performance and economics.