Energy Generation:

Wind energy

  • Small scale wind turbine technology for sustainable water desalination

    Small scale wind turbine technology for sustainable water desalination

    Supervisor: Professor Lin MA and Professor Mohamed Pourkashanian

    Water shortage is a significant issue restricting the social and economic developments of many parts of the rural coastal areas in the world. This project investigates a novel wind-powered water desalination technology for sustainable fresh water production. The project will focus on developing new vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) technologies to improve turbine efficiency and the integration into the water production system. Turbine aerodynamics design, simulation and wind tunnel tests will be conducted as part of the research. It is expected that the output from the research will significantly improve the VAWT technology and its application in coastal as well as urban areas.

  • Small scale wind turbine technology for sustainable water desalination

    Inflow generation for Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of the wind farms

    Supervisor: Professor Lin Ma, Professor Mohamed Pourkashanian, Professor Derek B Ingham and Dr Ava Shahrokhi

    Wind farms are large regions usually outside cities and include a number of wind turbines. An accurate simulation of the flow in the wind farm is essential in the design of the wind farm. This project concerns the turbulent inflow generation for large eddy simulation of the wind flow at wind farms.  Inflow generation techniques are among the top notch research topics in the wind engineering field. This instantaneous value of the velocity components consists of their mean and fluctuating values. This information is not known a priori, so it has to be evaluated in an accurate way. Currently, there are two main techniques for this purpose, the recycling (precursor) methods and synthetic methods. The first method is computationally very time consuming while the second method is not accurate for turbulent wind simulations. Therefore, this project will concern an alternative solution for inflow generation which can replace either of these techniques.

    This project, requires a good understanding of CFD and during the work includes simulations using ANSYS/FLUENT.

     

  • Small scale wind turbine technology for sustainable water desalination

    Large Eddy Simulation Around Buildings (LES)

    Supervisor: Professor Lin Ma, Professor Mohamed Pourkashanian, Professor Derek B Ingham and Dr Ava Shahrokhi

    Computational Wind Engineering has been developing rapidly over the last couple of decades. Among the numerical techniques, Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is capable of simulating complex unsteady turbulent flows, which is very useful for applications such as wind-induced noise/vibrations around buildings and structures. LES is among the top-notch and the most challenging CFD techniques. This project has three major parts.

    1)  Large eddy simulation using different subgrid-scale models.

    2) Boundary condition studies: The correct top and bottom boundary condition that help to maintain the turbulence properties in the domain and also the use of the correct turbulence inlet properties and implementation.

    3) Inflow generation: In order to implement LES around building, it is very important to simulate the wind effects correctly. This requires that the fluctuations of the flow to be initialized properly so that they can represent the wind in the computational domain. The main contribution of this project will be this last part which is also a very challenging part.

     

  • Small scale wind turbine technology for sustainable water desalination

    Adjoint based optimization of vertical axis wind turbines

    Supervisor: Professor Lin Ma, Professor Mohamed Pourkashanian, Professor Derek B Ingham and Dr Ava Shahrokhi

    Recently vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) have been more installed in urban areas than before. They are known to perform better in urban regions compared to horizontal axis wind turbines as they do not require alignment to the oncoming flow. However, these turbines are not aerodynamically efficient. This PhD thesis involves a precise design optimization based on adjoint techniques applied to the design of the vertical axis wind turbines. Adjoint based optimization techniques are closely related to the fluid Navier-Stokes equations and are technically the most efficient and accurate optimization methods applied to CFD problems.

    Depending on the student’s background on CFD, the general steps of the project steps are as follows: (i) Getting familiar with the CFD simulation of the VAWTs, (ii) Getting familiar with discrete and continuous adjoint based methods, (iii) Defining the case study, (iv) CFD simulation, and (iv) Optimization.

     

  • Small scale wind turbine technology for sustainable water desalination

    Large Eddy Simulation Around Buildings (LES)

    Supervisor: Professor Lin Ma, Professor Mohamed Pourkashanian, Professor Derek B Ingham and Dr Ava Shahrokhi

    Computational Wind Engineering has been developing rapidly over the last couple of decades. Among the numerical techniques, Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is capable of simulating complex unsteady turbulent flows, which is very useful for applications such as wind-induced noise/vibrations around buildings and structures. LES is among the top-notch and the most challenging CFD techniques. This project has three major parts.

    1)  Large eddy simulation using different subgrid-scale models.

    2) Boundary condition studies: The correct top and bottom boundary condition that help to maintain the turbulence properties in the domain and also the use of the correct turbulence inlet properties and implementation.

    3) Inflow generation: In order to implement LES around building, it is very important to simulate the wind effects correctly. This requires that the fluctuations of the flow to be initialized properly so that they can represent the wind in the computational domain. The main contribution of this project will be this last part which is also a very challenging part.

    For further information please contact Professor Derek B Ingham on d.ingham@sheffield.ac.uk